Category Archives: Hotel Cafe

The Civil Wars at The Wiltern: We Voted For Talent and Won

November 19, 2011
Los Angeles, CA

The Civil Wars

The Civil Wars (photo by Tec Petaja)

If you listen closely, there are multiple varying tones to applause: polite, obligatory, appreciative, supportive, congratulatory and many more. The sound of applause generates momentum and creates a feeling. Among the most special experiences is when audience applause sets the tone and spirit of a show, in contrast to coming after the events and moments of a show.

When John Paul White and Joy Williams (The Civil Wars) took the stage at The Wiltern, the applause led the show. It lasted a while. It was the sound of great triumph; the sound of victory. I don’t think I’ve experienced that specific tone of applause, in person, prior to this show. I imagine it’s heard during a parade when the hometown athlete brings home an Olympic gold medal. It may be similar to the sound of applause during the celebration of a victorious political campaign.

The applause of the crowd was amplified – we were applauding The Civil Wars, but we were also applauding ourselves. The Civil Wars are “our” band. There weren’t any radio stations, TV talk shows, publicity stunts, or million dollar marketing spends telling us we should listen to The Civil Wars. We discovered them and we told our friends. We purchase their music and sell out their live shows because we support true talent. The Civil Wars sold 100,000 records in 4 months, without a major label. The fans get credit for helping The Civil Wars succeed because there were only 3 factors in this “formula”: The Civil Wars, their music, and the fans.  We did it.  We “voted” for talent.  And we won.

In Los Angeles, we’ve purchased tickets to The Civil Wars’ sold out shows at The Hotel Cafe (capacity: 165), Largo (capacity: 280), The El Rey (capacity: 700) and now The Wiltern (capacity: 2,300).  We’ll follow them to The Greek (capacity: 5,900) and The Hollywood Bowl (capacity: 18,000). We’ll set up the “Who The Fuck Are The Civil Wars?!” website when they win their first Grammy. We’re proud of The Civil Wars.  This is the music we’re choosing.  These are the people we want to succeed.  That is the sound of the applause that preceded The Civil Wars’ show at The Wiltern.

After the applause, the celebration, the fuck yeahs and the thank yous, the show began and, in contrast to the sound of uproarious applause, the crowd was silent.  The music and voices of John Paul White and Joy Williams then carried us from one victory to the next, song after song, we celebrated The Civil Wars.

[Updated December 2, 2011]
The Civil Wars have been nominated for 2 Grammys this year: “Best Country Duo/Group Performance” and “Best Folk Album”. Here’s their interview with The Grammys upon learning the news:

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Butch Walker & The Black Widows: Rock & Roll and Beautiful Girls

March 7, 2011

Butch Walker & The Black Widows

Butch Walker & The Black Widows

. . . and alcohol.  What more can you ask for in a live show?

I dare you to not have fun at a Butch Walker show. It’s not possible. Even if your date is despicable, daft, or flirting with someone across the bar, Butch Walker will have a song to help you celebrate it.

Butch Walker and The Black Widows have been playing songs from their upcoming album, at an underground location, in what has become a Monday night residency of sorts.  Even if you know where the venue is, when you arrive, the first thing you see is a sign that says: Shhhhh.

Cheers

Cheers

As the Black Widows take their positions on stage, Butch Walker reminds everyone why they’re here: “Let’s have some fun, alright? We’re going to play the album straight through.  That’s all we’ve got for you. . . unless we get drunk later and it’s someone’s birthday and we sing a bunch of cover songs or something.” They did get drunk, it was someone’s birthday, they played the album straight through, and a good time was had by all.

Butch Walker

Butch Walker

It’s a rock & roll show: shots of whiskey are delivered from the bar, round upon round; there are rafters for the band to swing from. . . and they make good use of them; there are beautiful women on and off stage; guitars fall – or get knocked over – by beautiful women who are just trying to be helpful (so no one really gets upset about it); there are other beautiful women perfectly positioned to let the band know that equipment is falling; and not a drink goes untouched.

Ladies: you know what Butch Walker & The Black Widows, whiskey and beautiful women, bring to a venue? A bunch of cool men.  Live music and a hell of a lot more fun than a speed-dating event.

Butch Walker & The Black Widows

Butch Walker & The Black Widows

If you eavesdrop on band members after the show (they really tell the truth if they don’t know you’re listening), you’ll hear every single one of them say, “It’s a lot of fun!”  The show feels like a great house party just before the cops arrive as a result of numerous noise complaints, but with an amazing band as opposed to “that neighbor kid and his friends”.  The band is having fun on stage and it transfers to the audience. If you see Butch Walker & The Black Widows play, you will have a good time. Guaranteed.

I have several HD videos of the show and a lot of Butch Walker fans asking me to post them.  Initially, I considered that these are new songs, that the album is still being recorded, that perhaps something should remain a surprise.  What fun is it if everyone knows all the songs before they’re even released?? Then I remembered the first Butch Walker show I ever attended.  It was many years ago (not too many though because none of us is “old”).  It was an album release show at The Hotel Cafe.  Brand new songs.  In fact, it may have even been a week or two before the album was released, as a “warm-up show” to kick off a tour.  Regardless, it was a sold out show. People had driven in from Atlanta and Arizona and flown in from New York. It felt like a pilgrimage to hear these “new” Butch Walker songs, but the most striking thing happened when Butch Walker played: everyone already knew the words and they all sang along.  That show introduced me not only to Butch Walker, but to his fans, who are among the most dedicated, loyal, and passionate fans any artist could hope for.  Rock Is A Girl’s Best Friend didn’t exist at that time, or surely I would have written about that show.  That said, Butch Walker’s amazing fans have been a significant part of my experience of every show, so I wrote a bit about that here.

Anyway, here are a few videos for people who love Butch Walker – they deserve it:

This has become one of my favorite moments every week:

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Butch Walker Live at Hotel Cafe Feat. Pink, Hair Bands, and Chuck E Cheese’s

February 23, 2010
Butch Walker Record Release Show
Guest appearance by Pink
The Hotel Cafe, Los Angeles

Butch Walker and Pink at Hotel Cafe

Butch Walker and Pink at Hotel Cafe

Sometimes when Butch Walker announces a show in LA I think to myself, “I’ve seen Butch SO many times and I do love him very much, but . . . do I really need to see him again?”  To which, my more intelligent, forget-that-you-haven’t-slept-since-New-Year’s, self answers, “Fuck yes, you need to see him again!!!” Then, upon taking my own good advice, and going to see Walker perform “again,” I think to myself, “Damn, I really wish he’d play here more often!”  As a result, I see Butch Walker every time he performs in LA.  Or, as the case may be, if I’m traveling and notice Walker is touring through the city I’m in, I’ll see him there as well.  I have yet to travel to another city exclusively to see Butch Walker perform, but most of his fans have. . .  repeatedly.

Let me take a minute to set the scene for you because if you haven’t experienced a Butch Walker show and his amazing, dedicated fans, then you should know about this.  And for those of you who were there, or have been there before – well, you can attest.  The Hotel Cafe is a relatively small room (although, twice as large as it used to be) and Butch Walker sells the place out within minutes of putting tickets up for sale.  In order to accommodate as many of Walker’s fans as possible, The Hotel Cafe clears the room of the people who were there to see some of the earlier artists, and then  re-opens the room only to people who purchased the special event Butch Walker ticket.  Typically, at Hotel Cafe, you can pay a cover to see one artist and stay all night.

At 10:00 pm, Hotel Cafe staff “cleared the room,” which meant they moved everybody out of the performance room and into the back bar area.  Walker’s set wasn’t scheduled to start until 10:30 pm.  During that half hour break people could grab a drink and sit at the spacious booths in the lounge-y area, they could step outside and have a cigarette, grab a bite to eat, make some phone calls. . . they have half an hour to do whatever they like.  Ignoring all of the alternative, more relaxed options, Walker’s fans crammed themselves within the small space boxed between the performance room, back bar, and women’s restroom.  With the exception of the restrooms themselves, this is the tightest area of the venue.

It was nearly impossible to make my way through the crowd, to do one of the “more relaxed,” less healthy options. As I squeezed between and around people, apologizing for swimming upstream, I smiled and reminded everybody, “You have half an hour – you can do anything!”  And one by one, people smiled at me, shrugged their shoulders and said, “yeah, I know.” So they stood, happy as can be, cramped among each other, peering through the glass doors as Walker sound-checked.  When the doors finally did open, they poured into the room and took their positions as close to the stage as possible.  In a sold-out, packed room, 99% of the people positioned themselves within the first 30% of the room, to be as close to Walker as they could get.  You could have moved a 10-piece dining room set in the back of the room because nobody was standing “all the way back there.”

These are the kind of fans every Artist dreams of.  For Walker, this is nothing new.  These fans have been with Walker for many years, they’ve traveled around the country to see him, skipped finals, missed weddings, they were his “friends” on MySpace; now they’re his “fans” on Facebook and his “followers” on Twitter.  Given the option between smoking, drinking, eating, and Butch Walker – they’ll choose Butch Walker every time.  One might infer that Butch Walker is good for your health.

Once the show begins it’s easy to see why Walker has such dedicated fans.  In addition to his expressive performances and songs everybody knows the words to, Walker is extremely engaging, authentic, and quite simply, silly.  After playing a few songs from his newly released album, I Liked It Better When You Had No Heart, Walker asked the crowd, “Did anybody get the record today?”  A majority of the audience cheered in affirmation.  “I mean, did anybody get it legally?” As people responded with laughter, Walker clarified, “I mean, it’s okay. . . however you get it. . . I just want to make sure you know the words.”  In reality, Walker’s fans did purchase his latest album legally, propelling I Liked It Better When You Had No Heart to #1 on the iTunes Top Albums chart on the afternoon of release.  It’s currently still  holding at #14.

As Walker played song after song off his new album, fans sang along.  Between songs, there was a constant dialog between Walker and the audience. At one point, somebody shouted “Say ‘happy birthday’!”  “It’s not my birthday,” Walker pondered bewildered.  After giving it a moment to process, Walker continued, “Oh, it’s your birthday!! Not my birthday. . . What is this? Chuck E. Cheese’s?” Then, as only Butch Walker would do, he worked a “happy birthday” shout-out into the next song.  He later reflected, “The whole time I was playing that song I was thinking about what a dick I was about the whole birthday thing, so I had to acknowledge the birthday – Happy birthday.”

Walker prefaced his performance of “She Likes Hair Bands” with a little insight, “This song is about hair. I used to be in a hairband and it’s haunted me forever. . . thanks to Google.  Y’know, you think you’re gonna be cool; you think you’re gonna be alright; you think you’re gonna escape that old high school reunion photo. . . and then, there’s Google. . .  and Classmates.com”  Walker, accompanied by his band The Black Widows, belted out these words with a very catchy tune:

So Baby, lay down
Nobody is around
Watching as our bodies
Slowly sinking to the ground
Throw away your phone
and your inhibitions too
There’s a hundred dirty things
That I want to say to you

Upon finishing the song, and to bring things back full-circle,The Black Widows suggested that they record the video for “She Likes Hair Bands” at Chuck E. Cheese’s, with the Chuck E. Cheese Band.  “Better yet,” Walker suggested, “because my mind immediately goes to demented places, the video should be of US playing the song to kids at Chuck E. Cheese’s and freaking them out.”  (Now read the lyrics above again).  Everybody laughed as Walker continued his set.

Pink joins Butch Walker

Pink joins Butch Walker

One of many highlights of the show was when P!nk joined Walker to sing “Here Comes The. . .” off of Walker’s previous album Sycamore Meadows.  Now, P!nk may write very catchy pop songs, but the woman ROCKS.  I’ve never actually been to one of P!nk’s concerts, but I have seen her jump on stage with Walker a few times.  And every time I see her, I like her even more than the last.  Like Walker, Alecia Moore (aka P!nk) is genuinely, 100%, who she is.  And she is fuckin’ awesome. When they finished the song and Moore walked off stage, Walker began, “That was. . . ” and then looking at his long-time friend, Moore, said with a chuckle, “YOU!”  The audience laughed.  “It just feels so weird to say, ‘Ladies and Gentlemen – PINK!'” Walker added. [Scroll down to see video of Walker’s duet with P!nk]

It’s important to clarify that although Butch Walker fans may not jeopardize their place in line while waiting to get into the venue in order to get a drink, once they’re inside, it’s a different story altogether – everybody is drinking.  One of the reasons people clamor to get into Walker’s shows is because the shows feel like a party at your best friend’s house, when the parents are out of town, and the liquor cabinet is freshly stocked.  I don’t think I’ve ever been to a Butch Walker show without hearing a glass break (and as we’ve already established, I’ve been to many).

A few songs and several broken glasses later, on a gracious note, Walker said, “Sorry it took us so long to make this record.  Well, actually it didn’t take us that long to make the record – it just took us a long time to get it to you.  It only took 5 days to make the record. . . that was a year ago.” He then thanked everybody for buying the album (these really are the fans every Artist dreams of).  “It’s great to see it do so well.”

There’s one moment during all Butch Walker shows that, without fail, the dialog, laughter, and sometimes even the sing-alongs come to a halt; and that moment is when Walker sings “Joan.”  There’s deep reverence, respect, and complete silence every time Walker sings this song.  That’s the impact of Walker and his music – he will take you from the happiest, catchiest, highest of all highs, all the way to the other end of the spectrum, and you won’t want to miss a thing.

Walker finished the set with a favorite from his Marvelous 3 days, “Cigarette Lighter Love Song.”  As he sat at the piano, trying to get started, Walker announced, “I didn’t plan to play this long. I thought I’d be peaking at the 4th drink and then I could leave the stage. . . and now I’m up here. . . and the white keys look like black keys, and the black keys look like white keys, and you’re like, ‘I know you’re not gonna get this right.'”  That’s OK though, because in contrast to the audience’s revered silence during “Joan,” there’s one moment during every Butch Walker show that, without fail, everybody in the room finds themselves singing along at the top of their lungs, and that moment is when Walker sings “Cigarette Lighter Love Song.”

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Adventures in Rock with Jamie Drake and Cary Brothers

February 17, 2010
Hotel Cafe, Piano Bar, and everywhere in between

What is Adventures In Rock? On one hand, it’s what happens pretty much every night of my life. But more than that, it’s an idea my friend and talented musician, Jamie Drake (JD), and I (CW) came up with while hanging out last week.

You know those moments when you’re with your friends, laughing, having the time of your lives, and the question arises: “how can we keep doing this forever?” As we sat around a table at The Hotel Cafe, with some of our favorite friends late one night last week, Jamie and I decided that, at minimum, we’ll relive it the next day by writing about it. In addition to my live music reviews, we’ll post an Adventure In Rock once a week. . . for now. But if you like the series, we certainly have enough material to do it more often. At times we’ll include video, audio and interviews; we’ll always include pictures. And while we may set out to share one story, as the night evolves, so may our original concept. Chances are, that will happen more often than not.

The musicians we’re spending time with are not only talented Artists, at various phases of their careers, but are also really stand-up (depending how much they’ve had to drink), great people. They’re some of the most loyal, funny, dedicated friends we have. Some of us have been hanging out for close to 10 years. Some of us – Jamie and I, for example – have only known each other for a few months, but it feels like years. Over time, and through various Adventures In Rock, you will get to know some musicians and venues the way we do – after a show, instead of a show, during a show, at the 24-hour diner after the bars close, on the couch the morning after. Sometimes you’ll get insight into what was really going through a musician’s head when he or she wrote that song, designed that cover, ordered that “last drink.”  Other times, you’ll learn that the sad, serious, always lonely singer-songwriter is actually one of the funniest people you’ll ever meet (while also sad, serious, and always lonely) or that the outlandish, wild, crazy drummer is actually quite shy.

So as Jamie and I started dreaming up adventures. . .

JD: we just began throwing out ideas about how we could share this community of music with other people out there who might be interested in reading about how “exciting” our lives were – or rather – how we are all just about the same. We love Frisbee. We love music. We love good beer (Colette prefers good tequila) and real people. We also just wanted to somehow make all of our artist friends feel super rad. You know, we musicians make about 2 bucks when it comes down to it. We have this undying desire and message we have to share with the world, and sometimes the world just doesn’t give a damn.

CW: Also, musicians carry a wealth of information. Touring allows them to explore various cities around the world, often at odd hours. If you ever find yourself in an unfamiliar town, Tweet a musician – chances are they can tell you the best bar, favorite bartender, taco stand, 24-hour diner, and perhaps some stuff you’d rather not know.

JD: So while we were sitting amongst some of the coolest people on the block at this round table of sorts, I had some good news to share: “Soooo… You wanna see the album cover for my first record?”

CW: “Yeah! Break it out!”

JD: (Turning to Cary Brothers, who was sitting next to me at the table) “Speaking of album covers, I saw yours via Twitter the other day. I totally dig it.”

CW: “Let’s see it, Cary!”

Cary Brothers Under Control

Cary Brothers Under Control

JD: Cary took out his iPhone and pulled up a very cool black and white photo of him facing west with a fresh hair cut and of course, wearing that darn leather jacket he’s always got on.

CW: Meanwhile, around the other side of the table, some of our other friends (who will remain nameless for now) were conjuring up ideas for “useful” Apps. The definition of “useful” takes on a new life after a few drinks. Of course, we were entirely focused on Cary’s new album cover so we hardly noticed those other people. Although, since we’re adept mult-taskers, we may share this with you in the future.

JD: The font on Cary’s album cover was in the most possible badass font: comic sans. Totally kidding. In hearing him chat to someone about it a few weeks before viewing the photo, he had said that this was finally the album cover he had always wanted. Apparently, when he was visiting friends or something, one of his buddies just started taking some photos and they ended up being really great. These are the kinds of cool things I really dig about being an artist. Not having plans all the time and just seeing where the wind blows.

CW: I’ve known Cary for. . . I’ve lost track of how long, but many, many years. For me, it’s been extremely fun, inspirational, and gratifying, watching from the sidelines as my friend created all aspects of his latest album, “Under Control,” exactly how he wanted to. The album cover was the remaining piece I had yet to see. As Cary showed us the final artwork, I smiled, “that’s you!” That may not seem like a profound observation, but every time somebody is able to express themselves authentically, without interference from people with different agendas, it’s to be celebrated.  Just as the songs do, Cary’s album cover is an uncompromised expression of who he is, at this stage of his life. There’s a sense of confidence and stability, now that Cary has it all “Under Control.” Or, as he often puts it, is “all’s growned up now.” Don’t worry – he still smiles, drinks whiskey, and has a lot of fun.

After we had ample time to absorb Cary’s album cover, Jamie whipped out her phone and scrolled through photos until she found her album cover.

Jamie Drake When I Was Yours

Jamie Drake When I Was Yours

JD: Taking my Blackberry Storm out of my old raggy purse that I got at an Urban Outfitters 4 years ago (and should probably replace), I pulled up my album cover. I was a little nervous to be honest. Having this be my first “legit” album (well, that’s yet to be determined), there was the fear of laughter at how green I am as an artist. I mean, I was sitting next to Cary Brothers, come on now.

CW: I wish I had a picture of Jamie with her Blackberry Storm and Cary with his iPhone. It looked like a simultaneous showdown of technology and art. I love it when those intersections happen. Anyway, Jamie passed her phone around so we could check out her album cover.

JD: “So here’s my album cover…”

CW: After considering it for a bit, I turned to Jamie and said, “I know that a lot of thought and work goes into this, so I say this with the utmost respect and sensitivity, but essentially, you and Cary have the same album cover.”

Now, as you can see from the pictures, the covers themselves look nothing alike and each one illicits a completely different mood. I went on to explain that just as Cary’s album cover boldly expresses where he is in life now, Jamie’s does as well. Theoretically, that’s what the album cover would do – express the artist and the music – so I also know this isn’t a revolutionary observation. But when you actually know the Artist, you have additional insight into how accurately this reflection is portrayed. Speaking of reflections, I later learned that the photo on Jamie’s album cover is literally a reflection. . .

JD: “Oh yeah, that’s interesting.. I see what you’re saying about them being ‘the same.’ My friend who took the photo, Daley Hake, just had this idea of shooting my reflection in a puddle and then adding texture by layering a photo of skyline in the water… kinda looks like I’m in space…”

CW: “Wait, that changes everything. I thought you were looking up toward the sky, but in reality, you’re looking down in the water?”  It was one those mind f*ck moments where my eyes had seen one thing, my mind processed it a certain way, and then Jamie flipped it upside down.  “I love how that shifted my perspective. That’s the kind of stuff I think we should let others in on.”

We asked Cary to share his thoughts, but he was unavailable to comment. Actually, we didn’t really ask him what he thought. Instead, we stood up and along with Austin Hartley-Leonard, The Brother Sal, Marko and Matt Ramsey, we headed to Piano Bar where more Adventures In Rock ensued.

Follow us on Twitter for day to day tidbits: @rockisagirlsbff @jamiethedrake

PS – this is the first one, so it’s rated G. There’s only one place to go from here. . . to see Butch Walker at The Hotel Cafe.

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Priscilla Ahn: Tonight’s The Night To Try New Things

February 9, 2010
The Hotel Cafe

Priscilla Ahn

Priscilla Ahn

Priscilla Ahn was tonight’s “Special Guest” at The Hotel Cafe.   Ahn reflected, “I like ‘Special Guest’. . .   I’ve been ‘and more.’  Like when the flier says, ‘so and so’ and ‘so and so’ and ‘so and so,’ ‘and more,’ and I’m the only other one, so I must be ‘and more.’   Yeah. . . ‘Special Guest’ is nice!”

The reason for Ahn’s guest appearance was so she could try out new material before heading into the studio to record.  It’s a good idea, really – to see how it feels to play a song live before you record it.

Ahn began the set by warning, “I’m playing all new songs tonight, so you can’t scream out, ‘Play Dream, gd dammit!'”  She then paused for a moment, as if to confirm something, “I’m pretty sure I’m gonna mess up every one of these songs.”  After taking a minute to tune (and breathe), Ahn struck the first chord and sang her first note.  “”Ok, I messed that up. . .”

If that’s the case, then I hope Ahn messes up more often.   Note after note, song after song, Ahn delivered a captivating performance.  To say Ahn sings songs would be to oversimplify things – Ahn sings stories.   Every story she sang tonight described universal aspects of life, love, loss, belonging, and uncertainty.  The subject matter of Ahn’s music is universal, but it’s not cliche.  In fact, Ahn’s music goes straight to the core truth and vulnerability that you tend to keep safely tucked away.

Priscilla Ahn 2

"Tonight's the night to try new things"

From a tune about being a lost cause to a song about an awkward elf, Ahn weaves you through a web of emotions and reminds you that you’re not alone.  At least one other person has felt this way before and everything turned out okay.  Or, maybe it didn’t, but we’re still here, so let’s just embrace it. . . “This is something I must live with,” Ahn sings.

Among my favorite new Ahn tales was a song about taking a different route to the coffee shop one day and meeting a cute guy.  Break out of your routine, take a different approach, you will be rewarded.  There should be far more children’s books that expound this wisdom.  Try something new, do things differently, LIVE.

Ahn also introduced what she called her “one romantic song,” with a working title of “Torch.” You know this story – the one about that one love – THE one love.  There may have been many loves before and many loves since, but that one person is the only one who really knows you; the only one you really opened up to.  You experienced something more profound and intimate with that person because you allowed yourself to.  A lot has happened; life continues to happen, but no matter what, you will always share something with that person that can’t be described.  But — if it could be described, it would be this song.

I don’t know if you could hear a pin drop when Ahn performed tonight, but you could hear a bottle cap drop, and that seemed far more appropriate.

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Butch Walker Liked It Better When You Had No Heart

February 5, 2010

Butch Walker

Butch Walker

Listen to the new Butch Walker album “I Liked It Better When You Had No Heart” in the Soundcloud player below.  Vinyl will be available at Indie Record Stores (http://www.thinkindie.com/state.html) and Digital will be available at ONLY Think Indie (http://digital.thinkindie.com) on 2/9.  CD/Digital is available 2/23 for everyone else.

Record release show 2/23 at The Hotel Cafe.

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Terra Naomi at The Viper Room: Strippers, Vicodin, Infidelity

February 2, 2010
The Viper Room, Hollywood

Terra Naomi

Terra Naomi

Don’t ever let me miss a Terra Naomi show again!  A lot of people were excited about the last-minute Jack’s Mannequin show at The Viper Room last night.  I was equally excited about Terra Naomi’s opening set.

I’ve been following Naomi’s career and watching her perform since 2006, but I’ve missed a few shows recently and I won’t do that again.  During last night’s performance at The Viper Room, Naomi performed some of my old favorites including “Say It’s Possible” and “Vicodin Song,” along with several new songs which have already become favorites.

Terra Naomi

Terra Naomi

“You For Me” and “Nobody Knows You Anymore” are songs about love, loneliness, and being okay with it all.  Naomi’s voice is beautiful as ever, but what I love most about Naomi and her music is that she’s real.  Yes, she’ll sing about pills, strippers, and infidelity; and she’ll sing about them with a smile (likely because they’re in the past).

I often see (and choose not to write about) some pretty, off-the-shelf, perfect-package bands – the ones record labels love.  They look the part, they have catchy tunes, they sing about things they’ve seen on the news but haven’t experienced, and their lyrics are accessible enough that they don’t require any thought or reflection on the part of the listener.

Terra Naomi: okay with it all

Terra Naomi: okay with it all

Terra Naomi is the complete opposite of this and therefore represents everything I love.  She’s honest and real, never compromising her integrity or music for the sake of a cute pop song.  Her songs are fantastic, but you’ll likely not hear them on The Hills, so be sure to see Terra Naomi when you have the opportunity.

If you missed last night’s show at The Viper Room, you can catch Terra at Hotel Cafe tonight at 8:00 pm.

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